Warm weather

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Spring weather has finally come to the Northeast. Oh how we have waited for it! Everything seemed to stand still for a while, as if the late-winter season would last indefinitely. The ground thawed later than it has in recent years, the leaves on the trees were slow to form, the air temperature remained chilly… and then one day the switch flipped, and now spring is upon us. In earnest! The days are warm and sunny, and with the nice weather everything has come up from the ground. The dandelions went from dormant to fully grown in a few short days. As I wait for my perennials to come up I see the weeds are spreading out in the garden beds very quickly. I’ve been weeding and applying mulch on as much bare ground in the garden as possible, eager to greet the flowers that will bloom again this year. The vegetable garden is in, seeded and mulched, with more plants going in this month. The usual outdoor chores have started up again: repairing and replacing the fencing; setting up the watering hoses; and gathering rakes, shovels and gloves for handy access.

It feels like we’re rushing to get it all done. It’s necessary to stay on top of the garden projects because they do have the potential to get out of control quickly, but there is something else at work. It’s the shortness of the season that hangs over us and causes us to go outside and dig in the dirt with vigor, because in just a few months it will come to an end.

We have enjoyed our time outside immensely. We had several trees taken down and others pruned heavily. The work was much needed and long overdue. The overgrown trees that came down will be turned into firewood for our stove, and the apple trees that were pruned will (hopefully) produce better apples this year.

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Our days are very full right now, with schoolwork, field trips and house work all jockeying for the #1 position. Volunteer work is coming back in full swing too, as our UU congregation is set to welcome a potential minister to spend time with us for a week so that we may get to know one another. There is a host of work that comes with the excitement and activity. I am looking forward to it. Schoolwork comes in the form of spelling and writing lessons, math work, science and discovery lessons, music (piano and recorder), and so many more topics.

One school project we will be taking on this week is food allergies, specifically what ‘A’s body is doing when she reacts to a food, and what is happening in her body as she starts to outgrow her allergies. We are learning about it because on Thursday we will travel to Mount Sinai hospital in New York for a scrambled egg food challenge. She’ll eat eggs and if she doesn’t react, she will be able to say she’s not allergic to eggs anymore. Her first visit at Mount Sinai was last week. We have been going to Children’s Hospital Boston for a few years, but I decided to switch to Mount Sinai because their research direction is a bit different, and I thought it would be helpful to see someone there. Her new doctor thought she was ready for a scrambled egg challenge as she has been eating pancakes and cookies with egg without any reaction for about a year. I was so happy to hear that she was eligible for the challenge, because I have been thinking the same thing. Any doctors I asked about it didn’t know how to answer, so they replied with a cautious “No.” However, I do think ‘A’ will pass. We will find out on Thursday.

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The new chicks are growing just as fast as I remembered chicks to grow, which is fast. When you consider that they develop from egg to chick in only 21 days, it’s not surprising to watch how quickly they grow the first few months. I am not ready to say definitively who is rooster and who is pullet, but the telltale signs are emerging and it looks as though 50% are going to be female. I’ll know for sure in a few weeks. Some are clearly roo, with their tall, fighting stance, and their big, red combs. Some are clearly pullets, with their feather coloring and their docile nature. Some are up in the air still, as they look like hens but get tall around the roosters and go eye to eye. Peg, our injured pullet, is not healing well. She’s not in pain and she gets around on one leg all right, but the injured leg sticks out to the side and gets in her way. She was in a separate pen in the coop until yesterday, when I took her out and put her with the other chicks. I’m glad I had her separated the way I did – with only chicken wire between her and the other chicks. They were used to seeing and hearing her, and they accepted her right away. Time will tell what happens to her. If she can get around on her own, we might keep her, but if there is any doubt, she will go with the roosters when it is their time. The roosters are going to go to a friend who processes chickens on a small-scale farm. Time will tell. This hobby farm life isn’t always pretty.

Happy Mother’s Day to all of you! You all came from a mother, and some of you are mothers yourselves. Enjoy the day!

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